Beto Lecture: Protecting Human Rights Through Good Policing Practices

Illustration includes the U.S. Constitution, an American flag, and a police badge.

Dr. Jack Greene of Northeastern University will discuss "Policing for Human Rights: If not us, who? If not now, when?" as part of the Beto Chair Lecture Series on Feb 17 from 9:30 to 11 a.m. at the Criminal Justice Center.

Dr. Greene is a Professor and former Dean of the College of Criminal Justice at Northeastern University where he led academic and research programs focused on matters of criminology and justice policy. Recognized as one of the leading scholars on policing, Dr. Greene has written extensively on police service delivery, community approaches to policing, crime prevention and police management.

Dr. Greene has published five books, the two-volume Encyclopedia of Police Science, and more than 100 research articles, book chapters, research reports and policy papers on matters of policing in the U.S. and internationally.

His most recent research focuses on the strategic and practical problems that police encounter in community building, preserving human rights and in taking on a new security role in an era of terrorism. He has just completed co-editing, Criminologists on Terrorism with Brian Forst and James Lynch.

His lecture will focus on how the use of police discretion intersects with human rights with particular interest in the range of what are considered “coercive” police actions that most affect human rights. His lecture is most particularly focused on democratic policing, as policing in totalitarian regimes is largely based on fear rather than social or community consensus.

Dr. Greene has consulted for various agencies and organizations, including the Philadelphia Police Department, the U.S. Department of Justice, the National Institute of Justice, and the Rand Corporation, He currently serves on the research advisory committees of the International Association of Chiefs of Police and the Police Foundation. He is also a Fellow of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, and has been a consultant to major police and governmental agencies throughout his career. For nine years, he served a Commissioner on the Commission for the Accreditation of Law Enforcement Agencies.

Dr. Greene received a Multi-Disciplinary Social Science Ph. D. (Sociology, Public Policy and Criminology) from Michigan State University in 1977 and a Master of Science in Criminal Justice from Michigan State in 1974. He was a cum laude graduate of Northeastern University with a BS in Criminal Justice in 1973.

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