An Interactive Guide to Homeland Security

Dr. Willard Oliver
Dr. Willard Oliver

On Jan. 25, 1993, a Pakistani national emerged from his car at a stoplight outside CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia and began shooting at employees waiting in their vehicles for the light to change. Two CIA employees were killed; three more were injured.

Aimal Kasi’s action were driven by his personal hatred toward Americans being in the Middle East. Four years after the attack, the CIA and FBI tracked Kasi to Pakistan and arrested him. After a trial in the U.S., he was found guilty of murder and executed on Nov. 4, 2002.

Aimal Kasi
Aimal Kasi
This was the first attack that suggested that international terrorism was coming to U.S. soil. After September 11, 2001, the threat became all too real, and a new specialty was born in criminal justice: Homeland Security.

To prepare students and professionals to tackle the complex issues in this expanding field, Dr. Willard Oliver and his colleagues recent released Introduction to Homeland Security, a comprehensive textbook that explores the basic issues of Homeland Security, the history and context of the field, and what the future may hold. Designed for students in criminal justice and political science, as well as practitioners in the field, it examines the policies, administrations and organizations at the federal, state and local levels.

“It is a definitive textbook in this field,” said Dr. Oliver, a professor of Criminal Justice at Sam Houston. “Most books just deal with terrorism and counterterrorism measures. This book examines the administration of homeland security, the organizations and policies that carry it out, and the anti-terrorism activities that are involved.”

Former President George W. Bush stands with emergency workers outside the World Trade Center on 9/11.
Former President George W. Bush stands with emergency workers outside the World Trade Center on 9/11.
The book is co-authored by Nancy E. Marion, Associate Chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of Akron, and Joshua B. Hill, an Assistant Professor of Homeland Security and Terrorism at Tiffin University and graduate of the SHSU Ph.D. program.

The book uses real-word vignettes, which illustrate the key concepts of Homeland Security, such as the series of action taken by the government after the attacks at the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and on United Airlines Flight 93. It shifts the focus from terrorism to policy analysis, the functions of the Department of Homeland Security, and the implementation of the field at every level of government.

Book cover for An Introduction to Homeland Security.In addition to examining the history of Homeland Security and organizations in the field, the book also explores strategies to address the issue of terrorism and natural disasters, including anti-terrorism and counterterrorism, the incident command system, and communications and technology. It also looks at legal and political responses to Homeland Security and future applications as it relates to attacks or incident by sea, land and air.

The book takes an in-depth look into two key milestones in the field – the 9/11 attacks and the takedown of Osama Bin Laden on May, 1, 2011.

In addition to the book, the publisher, Jones & Bartlett Learning, has developed a companion web site to provide an interactive experience, including review questions, practice quizzes, an interactive glossary, flashcards, crossword puzzles, web links and scenario exercises that immerses participants in the roles of Homeland Security personnel who make decisions based on what was learned.

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